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Položky označené s: housing

Open Building Institute - Open source effort to make affordable eco-housing widely accessible - website - kickstarter #opensourceecology #ose #diy #openhardware #opensource #housing #sustainability #naturalbuilding #architecture


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http://openbuildinginstitute.org/
OBI is an open source initiative to make eco-housing accessible to everyone.
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Julien Guigner před 3 let od Diaspora

giving the homeless houses...



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In 2005, Utah set out to fix a problem that's often thought of as unfixable: chronic homelessness. The state had almost two thousand chronically homeless people. Most of them had mental-health or substance-abuse issues, or both. At the time, the standard approach was to try to make homeless people "housing ready": first, you got people into shelters or halfway houses and put them into treatment; only when they made progress could they get a chance at permanent housing. Utah, though, embraced a different strategy, called Housing First: it started by just giving the homeless homes.

Handing mentally ill substance abusers the keys to a new place may sound like an example of wasteful government spending. But it turned out to be the opposite: over time, Housing First has saved the government money. Homeless people are not cheap to take care of. The cost of shelters, emergency-room visits, ambulances, police, and so on quickly piles up. Lloyd Pendleton, the director of Utah's Homeless Task Force, told me of one individual whose care one year cost nearly a million dollars, and said that, with the traditional approach, the average chronically homeless person used to cost Salt Lake City more than twenty thousand dollars a year. Putting someone into permanent housing costs the state just eight thousand dollars, and that's after you include the cost of the case managers who work with the formerly homeless to help them adjust. The same is true elsewhere. A Colorado study found that the average homeless person cost the state forty-three thousand dollars a year, while housing that person would cost just seventeen thousand dollars.

Obrázek/fotografie

Housing First isn't just cost-effective. It's more effective, period. The old model assumed that before you could put people into permanent homes you had to deal with their underlying issues—get them to stop drinking, take their medication, and so on. Otherwise, it was thought, they'd end up back on the streets. But it's ridiculously hard to get people to make such changes while they're living in a shelter or on the street. "If you move people into permanent supportive housing first, and then give them help, it seems to work better," Nan Roman, the president and C.E.O. of the National Alliance for Homelessness, told me. "It's intuitive, in a way. People do better when they have stability." Utah's first pilot program placed seventeen people in homes scattered around Salt Lake City, and after twenty-two months not one of them was back on the streets. In the years since, the number of Utah's chronically homeless has fallen by seventy-four per cent.

Of course, the chronically homeless are only a small percentage of the total homeless population. Most homeless people are victims of economic circumstances or of a troubled family environment, and are homeless for shorter stretches of time. The challenge, particularly when it comes to families with children, is insuring that people don't get trapped in the system. And here, too, the same principles have been used, in an approach called Rapid Rehousing: the approach is to quickly put families into homes of their own, rather than keep them in shelters or transitional housing while they get housing-ready. The economic benefits of keeping people from getting swallowed by the shelter system can be immense: a recent Georgia study found that a person who stayed in an emergency shelter or transitional housing was five times as likely as someone who received rapid rehousing to become homeless again.

The recognition that it makes sense to give money away today in order to save money later isn't confined to homeless policy. It has animated successful social initiatives around the world. For more than a decade, Mexico has been paying parents to keep their children in school, and studies suggest that the program is remarkably cost-effective, once you take into account the economic benefits of creating a more educated and healthy population. Brazil's Bolsa Familia is a similar program. The traditional justification for such initiatives has been a humanitarian or egalitarian one. But a cost-benefit analysis suggests that, in many cases, such programs are also economically rational.

Our system has a fundamental bias toward dealing with problems only after they happen, rather than spending up front to prevent their happening in the first place. We spend much more on disaster relief than on disaster preparedness. And we spend enormous sums on treating and curing disease and chronic illness, while underinvesting in primary care and prevention. This is obviously costly in human terms. But it's expensive in dollar terms, too. The success of Housing First points to a new way of thinking about social programs: what looks like a giveaway may actually be a really wise investment.

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#utah #homeless #solution #housing #free

utah, homeless, solution, housing, free

Give the Homeless Homes - The New Yorker

James Surowiecki on Utah’s cost-effective approach to chronic homelessness: instead of putting people into shelters or halfway houses, just hand them the keys to a new place.
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atom jack před 4 let od Diaspora

25 Facts About the Federal Reserve




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Unelected, unaccountable central planners from a private central #bank run our financial #system and manage our #economy. There is a reason why financial markets respond with a yawn when Barack #Obama says something about the economy, but they swing wildly whenever Federal Reserve Chairman Ben #Bernanke opens his mouth. The Federal Reserve has far more power over the U.S. economy than anyone else does by a huge margin. The Fed is the biggest Ponzi scheme in the history of the world, and if the American people truly understood how it really works, they would be screaming for it to be abolished immediately. The following are 25 fast facts about the #FederalReserve that everyone should know…
  • The greatest period of economic growth in #US history was when there was no central bank.
  • The #UnitedStates never had a persistent, ongoing problem with #inflation until the Federal Reserve was created. In the century before the Federal Reserve was created, the average annual rate of inflation was about half a percent. In the century since the Federal Reserve was created, the average annual rate of inflation has been about 3.5 percent, and it would be even higher than that if the inflation numbers were not being so grossly manipulated.
  • Even using the official numbers, the value of the U.S. #dollar has declined by more than 95 percent since the Federal Reserve was created nearly 100 years ago.
  • The secret November 1910 gathering at Jekyll Island, Georgia during which the plan for the Federal Reserve was hatched was attended by U.S. Senator Nelson W. Aldrich, Assistant Secretary of the Treasury Department A.P. Andrews and a whole host of representatives from the upper crust of the #WallStreet banking establishment.
  • In 1913, Congress was promised that if the Federal Reserve Act was passed that it would eliminate the business cycle.
  • The following comes directly from the Fed’s official mission statement: “To provide the nation with a safer, more flexible, and more stable monetary and financial system. Over the years, its role in #banking and the #economy has expanded.”
  • It was not an accident that a permanent income tax was also introduced the same year when the Federal Reserve system was established. The whole idea was to transfer wealth from our pockets to the federal government and from the federal #government to the #bankers.
  • Within 20 years of the creation of the Federal Reserve, the U.S. economy was plunged into the #GreatDepression.
  • If you can believe it, there have been 10 different economic recessions since 1950. The Federal Reserve created the “#dotcom bubble”, the Federal Reserve created the “#housing bubble” and now it has created the largest bond bubble in the history of the planet.
  • According to an official government report, the Federal Reserve made 16.1 trillion dollars in secret #loans to the big banks during the last financial #crisis. The following is a list of loan recipients that was taken directly from page 131 of the report…
  • The Federal Reserve also paid those big banks $659.4 million in fees to help “administer” those secret loans.
  • The Federal Reserve has created approximately 2.75 trillion dollars out of thin air and injected it into the financial system over the past five years. This has allowed the #stockmarket to soar to unprecedented heights, but it has also caused our financial system to become extremely unstable.
  • We were told that the purpose of #quantitativeeasing is to help “stimulate the economy”, but today the Federal Reserve is actually paying the big banks not to lend out 1.8 trillion dollars in “excess reserves” that they have parked at the Fed.
  • Quantitative easing overwhelming benefits those that own stocks and other financial investments. In other words, quantitative easing overwhelmingly favors the very wealthy. Even Barack Obama has admitted that 95 percent of the income gains since he has been president have gone to the top one percent of income earners.
  • The gap between the top one percent and the rest of the country is now the greatest that it has been since the 1920s.
  • The Federal Reserve has argued vehemently in federal court that it is “not an agency” of the federal government and therefore not subject to the Freedom of Information Act.
  • The Federal Reserve openly admits that the 12 regional Federal Reserve banks are organized “much like private corporations“.
  • The regional Federal Reserve banks issue shares of stock to the “member banks” that own them.
  • The Federal Reserve system greatly favors the biggest banks. Back in 1970, the five largest U.S. banks held 17 percent of all U.S. banking industry assets. Today, the five largest U.S. banks hold 52 percent of all U.S. banking industry assets.
  • The Federal Reserve is supposed to “regulate” the big banks, but it has done nothing to stop a 441 trillion dollar interest rate derivatives bubble from inflating which could absolutely devastate our entire financial system.
  • The Federal Reserve was designed to be a perpetual debt machine. The bankers that designed it intended to trap the U.S. government in a perpetual #debt spiral from which it could never possibly escape. Since the Federal Reserve was established nearly 100 years ago, the U.S. national debt has gotten more than 5000 times larger.
  • The U.S. government will spend more than 400 billion dollars just on interest on the national debt this year.
  • If the average rate of interest on U.S. government debt rises to just 6 percent (and it has been much higher than that in the past), we will be paying out more than a trillion dollars a year just in interest on the national debt.
  • According to Article I, Section 8 of the U.S. Constitution, the U.S. Congress is the one that is supposed to have the authority to “coin #Money, regulate the Value thereof, and of foreign Coin, and fix the Standard of Weights and Measures”. So exactly why is the Federal Reserve doing it?
  • There are plenty of possible alternative financial systems, but at this point all 187 nations that belong to the #IMF have a #centralbank. Are we supposed to believe that this is just some sort of a bizarre coincidence?
#capitalism #fascism #dictatorship #banks #petrodollar #fiatmoney #currency #fail #fuckthesystem
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himindri před 6 let od Diaspora
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